Fields Of Life

Artist based in Boulder, CO

Emily Tayman
mandytsung:

In-progress snippets of my piece for the Kubrick show at @spoke_art in Sept. I’m sneaking in some of the impasto oil technique and other textures that I’ve been playing with lately. I tried to censor as little as possible so sorry if boobs offend you 😕

mandytsung:

In-progress snippets of my piece for the Kubrick show at @spoke_art in Sept. I’m sneaking in some of the impasto oil technique and other textures that I’ve been playing with lately. I tried to censor as little as possible so sorry if boobs offend you 😕

#Emilytayman #visionary art #oilpaint #painting

rhamphotheca:

Clues to Lost Prehistoric Code Discovered in Mesopotamia
by Owen Jarus
Clay balls from Mesopotamia have revealed clues to a lost code that was used for record-keeping about 200 years before writing was invented. Archaeologists are using CT scanning and 3D modelling to crack a lost prehistoric code hidden inside clay balls, dating to some 5,500 years ago.
The balls, often called “envelopes” by researchers, were sealed and contain tokens in a variety of geometric shapes — the balls varying from golf ball-size to baseball-size. Only about 150 intact examples survive worldwide today…
(read more: Live Science)
photo by Anna Ressman/Oriental Institute, Univ. of Chicago

rhamphotheca:

Clues to Lost Prehistoric Code Discovered in Mesopotamia

by Owen Jarus

Clay balls from Mesopotamia have revealed clues to a lost code that was used for record-keeping about 200 years before writing was invented. Archaeologists are using CT scanning and 3D modelling to crack a lost prehistoric code hidden inside clay balls, dating to some 5,500 years ago.

The balls, often called “envelopes” by researchers, were sealed and contain tokens in a variety of geometric shapes — the balls varying from golf ball-size to baseball-size. Only about 150 intact examples survive worldwide today…

(read more: Live Science)

photo by Anna Ressman/Oriental Institute, Univ. of Chicago